Blog
  • Foundation

    Matthew 7:24-27 says, “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock. And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell, and great was the fall of it.”

    Does anyone know where this small piece of tile is from? This is the bathroom tile from Covenant’s old bathrooms. I kept this from the demolition after hurricane Harvey destroyed our school and I’ve had it for almost a year now. I keep it as a reminder of when Covenant was flooded. But not in a negative way. This is a reminder of when things were tough and we made it through. This is a reminder that when we pass through waters God will be with us. That God is our only hope. We cannot make it alone. With that in mind I want to tell you a story.

    There were once two good friends Ron and Lee who were both building their houses at the same time. Ron wanted to build his house carefully and thoroughly. He dug deep to pour a sturdy foundation. He didn’t cut corners or use cheap materials; he built his house firm. Lee on the other hand wanted to move in fast and he didn’t care how the house was built. He wasn’t interested in the foundation, materials or anything except that the house would be finished quickly. A couple of months later, they are both moved into their respective houses and they hear that a terrible storm is heading in their direction, a hurricane. Now Ron isn’t worried because he’s confident that the house he built will protect him. Lee on the other hand is less certain. His house is rickety, yet he doesn’t want to abandon the house he’s so fond of, and it’s new, and it’s his. He decides to brave the storm. The storm hits Lee’s house first. Wind, rain, thunder, lightning, ruin his house and thankfully he’s alright. The storm hits Ron’s house next. Wind, rain, thunder, lightning, but his house stands strong. He built his house on a solid foundation and because of that it did not fall.

    We need to build our lives on a firm foundation. We need to put our faith in God and not ourselves. God is the only thing in this world that will not change. We must put our faith in God alone because as it is said in the hymn, “In Christ alone my hope is found, He is my light, my strength my, my song. This cornerstone, this solid ground, firm through the fiercest drought and storm.” Christ is the only thing that gives hope; He is everything. He is a firm foundation in the most drastic circumstances. If you put your faith in anything else you will fail. If you build your house on success, friendship, fame, family, money, or anything that isn’t Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior, when the storms come, your house, your life will not be able to stand tall.

    Now I don’t want to leave you today with a challenge of be better or trust God. I want to leave you asking this: What is your foundation? Did you build it thoroughly or did you cut corners? Is God your foundation? 

    Prayer: God, thank you. Thank you for allowing us all life today. Please help us build our foundation upon you. Please remind us when we aren’t following you, when we are cutting corners and not digging deep and putting our full faith in you. We know we can’t do it alone. Guide us and fill us up in order to follow your will for us. In Jesus’ name Amen.


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Jon, one of our twelfth grade students (pictured).

  • Great Expectations

    This week in Chapel, I shared a story about our dog, Merlin. Merlin lives up to his name; he’s a wizard at escaping. It was through his escape tactics that we met Merlin. Before Merlin was our dog, he belonged to our neighbors and they would text us frantically to ask for help when Merlin escaped, and Jon would run around the neighborhood to find him and bring him home. Eventually, Jon offered to walk Merlin in hopes that regular walks would make disappearing acts less frequent. This was a win-win for everyone. Jon really wanted a dog, Merlin really wanted a walk. About two years ago, our neighbors moved to the country and asked if Jon would consider keeping Merlin permanently. And that’s when Merlin became our dog. We’re very thankful that this little Silky Terrier is part of our lives.

    Like all of us, Merlin has a story. He was rescued from the streets of Chicago by a friend of our neighbors as a little puppy. If you’ve been around dogs, you can tell by the way he crouches and hides that he’s had hard life. Because of his traumatic past, it’s hard to be tough on Merlin… at least it’s hard for me. It’s not hard for my husband, Dave. He believed that we were making excuses for Merlin and allowing him to behave badly just because he’s had a hard life. You see, when Merlin wants a walk, which he always does, he pesters us until we agree to walk him. When we finally give in he jumps around in circles and pounces all over the place so that it’s impossible to get the leash on him. Dave would have none of this. He refused to allow Merlin to behave in this way.  He was bound and determined that Merlin would sit calmly on a designated chair and let Dave put the leash on him in order to go for a walk. 


    Because of his traumatic past, it’s hard to be tough on Merlin… 
    at least it’s hard for me.


    I confess that I played the part of the nagging wife on this one.  “Honey, he’s not capable of doing that,” I said foolishly. Because of Merlin’s early struggles and pain and suffering as a puppy, I determined that he was incapable of learning something new. I was wrong. It took a few weeks of consistent and insistent effort, but Merlin eventually did learn to sit still and let Dave put the leash on him before heading outside. My husband’s high expectations allowed Merlin to change. And now, the rest of us reap the benefits because Merlin calms down when we put the leash on him too (if we hold the same high expectations).

    Because each of us are made in God’s image, we are infinitely more capable of change than Merlin or any other creature. Being image bearers of God Himself makes us creative, intelligent, inventive, and able to change. Animals make the same kinds of homes and nests they’ve been making for centuries, but humans invent new and better ways all the time. Often what keeps us from applying this same creative effort in our own lives is that we are content with low expectations. We dwell in the past and make excuses instead of change.

    Christ provides the means, the motive, and the opportunity to change as we embrace the struggles in our lives. Each of us has experienced struggle and difficulty and if we lean in to the hard things and listen to feedback from others, we can change. Our teachers want the best for our students and want to help them continue to revise their story. In our house huddles, each house leader asked everyone to consider where they could set higher expectations for themselves. As I listened to these discussions, I heard adults talk about better time management and I heard students talk about wanting to be more obedient and focused. May God renew our minds by the power of His Word so that we are transformed more and more as we seek to follow Him. 2 Corinthians 5:17, "Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come."

    As presented by Mrs. Collins to our student body in Chapel on Friday, September 7, 2018.

  • Thankgiving

    1 Thes 5:16-18

    How many of you celebrated Thanksgiving last week? I’m sure many of us joined our families, either through the terror of holiday travel or by staying at home and relaxing. Some of us probably watched the football games or caught up with grandma—and I’m positive everyone here ate plenty of food. But wait… How many of you remembered to give thanks? What does it even mean to be thankful? That’s not something we usually think about, even on the big day itself. Being thankful means we are appreciative of whatever gift we have received, and we feel the desire to give thanks for it. But, that still leaves the question: why don’t we give thanks year round?

    The Bible says in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18, “Be joyful always; pray continually; give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.” I want you to pay attention to the idea of giving thanks in ALL circumstances, because that’s probably the thing most of us struggle with. It’s easy to give thanks when things are good—but what about when things are tough? For example, as much as Hurricane Harvey was a terrible disaster that left our school flooded and many other homes with feet of water in them, it gave us an opportunity to be thankful for what we have in life—thankful for the things that truly matter—for our homes and for the safety of our families, and even thankful for the smaller things like clean water and our electricity.

    We have many opportunities to give thanks year-round. We don’t just have to give our thanks on one day out of the year; instead we should give thanks whenever we can, because everything we have received has been through God’s grace. So right now, I challenge you, Covenant Academy, to not only give thanks for the large things, but also the small ones too. I challenge you to remember that no matter how dark times in your life may seem, what comes from that hardship will be something to be thankful for.

    And with that, I say “thank you!”


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Austin, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

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